Women’s Hockey Smashes Holy Cross for Third Straight Time, Moves into First Place in Hockey East

By Catherine Morrison

Photo by Sarah Olender

Wednesday night’s tilt was one of extremes. Northeastern looked to grab the top spot in Hockey East, while Holy Cross was just barely holding off Merrimack to stay out of last place. The contest came a week after the teams’ last meeting, when Northeastern notched their biggest win in 20 years.

Tonight’s first period looked very different from the last game, with Holy Cross staving off Northeastern’s superior offense for the first 15 minutes. But it could only last so long before Northeastern seized control. Codie Cross skated around the goal, knocked the puck off a defender’s stick, and watched her first goal of the season skid in. It was Northeastern’s 24th first-period goal on the year.

The Huskies kept their momentum going, and a minute later Tessa Ward fired at Crusader goalie Julia Pelletier. Pelletier blocked the attempt, but Northeastern’s Peyton Anderson was there to clean up the rebound shot that became Northeastern’s second goal. The play was reviewed to determine whether Anderson had kicked the goal in, but the footage confirmed that the puck hit her leg, so the call stood.

With thirty seconds left in the period, Northeastern got another rebound goal when Anderson shot from just in front of the blue line. Again Pelletier rejected the shot, but Chloe Aurard knocked it in for her 12th goal of the season and Northeastern’s third in four minutes. On the play, Cross logged the first of her four assists on the night.

Holy Cross made a last-ditch attempt to get on the board with Bailey Bennet shot, but Aerin Frankel made a midair block. When Bennet skated away she was knocked down by Megan Carter, starting a Holy Cross power play that would continue into the second period.

Holy Cross couldn’t convert on the power play, and when Frankel leg-blocked another Bennet shot a few minutes later, any momentum the Crusaders has built on the power play finally evaporated. It didn’t take long for Northeastern to continue their goalfest, and Pro Ambitions Rookie of the Week Katy Knoll got her chance when Pelletier blocked a shot by Matti Hartman. The puck went careening towards Knoll, who quickly slammed the puck in off the rebound.

Pelletier made a great save against Alina Mueller, but was stymied by Hartman, who received the puck from Jess Schryver, faked Pelletier out, and easily knocked the puck in for the fifth goal of the game. Northeastern dominated the second period, with 21 shots on goal to Holy Cross’s nine.

Five minutes into the third, it looked like yet another Husky was going to add a goal when Skylar Fontaine made a great shot at the goal, but it was slightly off and caromed off the pipe. Kate Holmes — who would have received an assist had Fontaine’s shot found the back of the net — decided that assisting Mia Brown was just as good. The resulting goal looked effortless.

With just under eight minutes left and the game comfortably in hand, Northeastern head coach Dave Flint pulled Frankel in favor of freshman Alexa Matses. It was Matses’ first collegiate appearance and, although she looked green, she held down the fort. With just seconds left to play, Mueller sped towards the goal and slid the puck in behind Pelletier, with Cross earning her fourth assist and fifth point. The game ended with a 7–0 Husky win.

Holy Cross looked a bit tighter on defense compared with last week’s 11–0 drubbing at Northeastern’s hands. Pelletier made some great saves, but without sufficient backup from her teammates she didn’t stand a chance against the onslaught of Husky rebound goals. Northeastern scored multiple goals in every period, with seven total goals from seven different players.

The win earned Northeastern a season sweep over Holy Cross. This was to be expected given Northeastern’s unanimous first-place finish — and Holy Cross’s last-place finish — in the Hockey East preseason poll. But the 24–0 combined scoring margin was impressive even for this matchup.

Northeastern improved to 14–2 (11–2 HEAW) and leapfrogged Boston College for first place in the Hockey East standings. On the cusp of the season’s halfway point, they are ranked third in the nation.

The Huskies have a whopping 25 days off before their next tilt against Vermont on December 30th.

Men’s Basketball Manhandles Maine, Roland Scores 1000th Point

By Michael Petillo

Photo by Sarah Olender

Jordan Roland tallied 28 points and the Northeastern Huskies defended home court against the Maine Black Bears, winning 78–63 on Wednesday night. Roland notched his 1,000th career point while leading the Huskies to their second consecutive win.

Northeastern (5–4) started slowly, committing turnovers on each of their first three possessions before a Roland three broke the ice.

The Huskies outplayed Maine (2–6) for most of the first half, getting scoring bursts from freshman Tyson Walker and redshirt sophomore Jason Strong to maintain a solid margin for most of the period. The Black Bears moved the ball well, however, keeping the game close by beating the Northeastern defense on several backdoor cuts for easy layups.

Northeastern coach Bill Coen made the necessary adjustments at halftime to slow the Maine attack. The Huskies built a double-digit lead and held it for most of the second half.

“I thought it was just a bigger commitment to our original game plan. We did it better and with more urgency in the second half,” Coen said.

Northeastern turned up their defensive intensity, turning 16 Maine turnovers into 22 points. Walker and Bolden Brace paced the team with four steals each.

Maine mounted a comeback with around eight minutes to play, but Northeastern consistently answered, usually thanks to Strong, Walker, or Roland, whose last two free throws put him into the 1,000-point scoring club. The feat is remarkable considering Roland spent his first two years coming off the bench for George Washington, scoring less than 300 points. He is now 39th on Northeastern’s all-time list.

Roland was as reserved and humble as ever following his big performance. “Obviously it feels good, it’s a milestone, but I feel like it’s not something I’m super concerned with,” he said. “We’re trying to win a CAA Championship this year and that’s the main thing that I’m really focused on.”

Northeastern returns to action at Matthews Arena this Saturday against Davidson, where they’ll try to extend their winning streak to three games. Milton Posner and Mack Krell will be on the call, with coverage beginning at 3:45 PM EST.

Men’s Basketball Tops Weber State Behind Three-Point Torrent

By Milton Posner

Photo by Sarah Olender

As Northeastern took the court against Weber State Wednesday morning, they were fresh off a close defeat at Drake’s hands, a defeat caused in part by 19 Northeastern turnovers and the resulting disparity in shot attempts.

For the second day in a row, Northeastern give the ball away 19 times. But this time, they did everything else right, and walked away with a 79–69 win over the Wildcats in their third and final game in the Gulf Coast Showcase in Estero, Florida.

Northeastern hit first, and they hit hard. Tyson Walker opened the game with a three-pointer.

When Weber State’s Cody John responded with a three, Jordan Roland hit right back with a triple of his own. On the Huskies’ next possession, Bolden Brace snatched an offensive rebound from the jaws of three Wildcats. The contested fadeaway three they earned from the rebound doesn’t seem like a bargain on its face. But when it’s Jordan Roland taking the shot, this sort of thing can happen.

A moment later, when Shaquille Walters threaded a bounce pass to Walker for a transition layup, Weber State was forced to call for time. Three minutes in, Northeastern had opened an 11–3 lead.

When the teams resumed play, Northeastern decided the right corner was looking pretty good. Brace set up shop there, Roland dished him the rock, and Brace nailed a three, passing Chaisson Allen for sole possession of sixth place on Northeastern’s career three-point list.

Seconds later, Roland stole the ball, pushed the pace, and found Walters behind the line in the same spot. Good.

Next possession, same shooter, same spot. Good.

After two made free throws by Greg Eboigbodin, Brace tried a pump-fake, sidestep three from the same spot. Same result.

After two games of tough shots, the Husky offense had finally clicked. The ball moved without friction, passes were crisp, players moved without the ball. Passers screened for the players they dished to and any player who caught the ball immediately did something with it, preventing Weber State from rotating to shooters in time. The open looks helped NU shoot 57 percent from three — including 10-for-14 in the first half — a marked improvement from the 31 percent they shot in last two games.

Northeastern swarmed Weber State’s passing lanes, choking their offense, forcing live ball turnovers, and generating easy transition looks. That, plus the infrequent whistles in the first ten minutes, aided the Huskies’ momentum and helped them jump out to a 20-point first half lead.

Then Northeastern turned the ball over five times in two minutes, Weber State trimmed the lead to 13, and it appears as though yesterday’s habits were returning to bite the Huskies.

But Eboigbodin and Roland had other plans. Their superb play to close the half handed the Huskies an 18-point lead entering the locker room.

In the last three games, Eboigbodin has played more minutes — and scored more points — than in any of the games before. Wednesday’s game saw his best effort yet, as he logged 13 points (5–6 FG, 3–3 FT) pulled down seven rebounds, and dished out three assists without turning the ball over once. He showed off his agile post moves with a couple of jump hooks, finished a nifty lob from Walker, and even drove to the basket for an and-one layup.

But his best play came a minute into the second half. He had the ball on the wing when Brace took a free-throw line screen and curled along the right side of the lane toward the basket. The screen didn’t get Brace much separation and he wasn’t expecting a pass. But Eboigbodin threw a bounce pass so perfect that Brace, who wasn’t looking, corralled it and laid it in without a hitch.

Roland, who scored a combined 22 points in his last two games, came alive Wednesday with a 24-point showing. Eleven of those points came in the last four minutes of the first half, courtesy of two three-point fouls — he made five of six free throws — and two three-point buckets.

Brace turned in his first quality performance since his 20-point, 12-rebound showing against UMass on November 12. He picked up just two fouls — which allowed him to play 36 minutes — and notched 18 points (7–10 FG, 4–6 3FG) and seven boards. It was just his second double-digit scoring effort in eight games this year, and it showed how much more efficient, well-spaced, and free-flowing the offense can be when teams need to worry about him and throw as many bodies at Roland.

Though the stat sheet would claim Tyson Walker’s eight points and five assists were somewhat negated by his four fouls and four turnovers, his passing was eye-popping. He threw crisp, accurate, cross-court passes to open shooters, demonstrating chemistry and positional awareness that would be excellent for anyone, let alone a freshman point guard in his eighth game with the team.

Shaq Walters, starting his sixth game this season, turned in eight points and eight rebounds. He nailed a couple of first-half threes, indicative of his expanded skill set and role in the offense.

After three games in three days, the Huskies (4–4) can rest for six days before their Wednesday tilt against Maine at Matthews Arena. Michael Petillo and Matt Neiser will call the game for WRBB, with coverage beginning at 6:45 PM EST.

Nineteen Turnovers Sink Men’s Basketball Against Drake

By Milton Posner

Photo by Sarah Olender

As the game clock steadily ticked off its final seconds, Jason Strong took charge. He took the ball out top, put his head down, and drove down the right side of the lane. He tossed the ball with a gentle hooking motion, and his layup settled neatly into the basket with 0.6 seconds remaining.

His teammates were frustrated. A couple of them had yelled at Strong as he charged down the lane. Bolden Brace gestured animatedly to no avail.

Northeastern needed a three, not a two. Strong’s layup pulled cut the deficit to one, and there wasn’t enough time left to do anything about it.

An execution mistake. But Northeastern’s 59–56 loss to Drake on Tuesday afternoon didn’t stem from Strong’s mistake alone.

It began with turnovers. Both teams had 64 possessions, and Northeastern gave the ball up on 19 of theirs. Nearly every Husky had at least one giveaway; five players had more than two. Jordan Roland led the way with six; Max Boursiquot — despite playing just 12 minutes before fouling out — had four.

The turnovers handed the Bulldogs a 20–7 advantage in points off turnovers, but in a game without a ton of transition basketball, the biggest turnover-induced hurt came elsewhere. Northeastern lost despite outshooting Drake by 14 percent, a fact possible only because Drake attempted 59 shots to Northeastern’s 39. Northeastern’s turnovers — combined with the Bulldogs’ 11–2 offensive rebounding margin — allowed for the gap in attempts.

Foul trouble hampered the Huskies in the first half, with Brace and Tyson Walker both heading to the bench with two early fouls. It was the third consecutive game in which foul trouble has limited Brace’s playing time. Walker, who exited after just five minutes, did not return. The personnel losses hurt a team already missing starting big man Tomas Murphy, who has missed the last three games with an ankle injury.

Heavy Drake fouling put Northeastern in the bonus around the halfway mark in the first half; they spent the last four minutes in the double bonus. The Huskies turned this into an 11–4 free-throw advantage, which helped them reclaim the lead after an 8–0 Drake run to open the game. Myles Franklin led the way, netting five points from the charity stripe.

Roland struggled for the second straight game. Though he enjoyed some success driving to the basket and nailed a spectacular, standstill, fadeaway three-pointer. Drake’s constant, intense defense often denied him the ball and crowded him on jumpshots. He made just one of six attempts from three and lost the ball trying to burrow his way to the basket through multiple defenders. He finished with 13 points and, for the first time this season, ceded the title of nation’s top scorer. Delaware guard Nate Darling now tops the list.

That said, this and-one floater was gorgeous.

Brace stayed out of foul trouble in the second half and netted himself a milestone. His two three-pointers tied him with Chaisson Allen for sixth place on Northeastern’s career list.

Shaq Walters played a strong first half for the Huskies, scoring nine points and helping the Huskies to a 7–0 run and a three-point halftime lead.

Roman Penn and Anthony Murphy led the Bulldogs, combining for 32 points. Penn had an inefficient shooting night but made up for it at the foul line, while Murphy nailed six of his 11 shots and pulled down seven boards.

Though the offensive struggles felled Northeastern, their defense was largely solid. They rotated well to perimeter shooters, limiting the Bulldogs to a measly 24 percent from downtown. Greg Eboigbodin played well on the interior, contesting inside shots and picking up just two fouls, a big improvement considering his foul troubles in the season’s first few games.

But it was ultimately in vain. The mistakes kept piling up — errant passes, unsure ballhandling, a slew of travels and offensive fouls, anything to end possessions without attempting a shot. The frustration came to a head on the last play.

With Northeastern inbounding the ball down three with 11 seconds remaining, it’s possible head coach Bill Coen instructed his team to sprint downcourt, get a quick two, and foul. It would certainly explain Strong’s no-hesitation drive. But Myles Franklin stumbled catching an inbounds pass in the backcourt. Though he ultimately saved the ball, it ate several precious seconds off the clock. When Drake put the lead back up to three with a pair of free throws, Northeastern couldn’t do anything with 0.2 seconds left.

Northeastern will play its final game of the tournament tomorrow at 11 AM EST against the loser of the Murray State–Weber State game.

Men’s Basketball Falls to South Alabama

By Milton Posner

Photo by Sarah Olender

As Boston trudges inexorably toward winter, as the days end earlier, the winds blow harder, and the temperatures drop, the Northeastern Huskies migrated south, if only for a few days.

They flew to Fort Myers, Florida for the Gulf Coast Showcase, an annual eight-team tournament. The Huskies’ three-day, three-game slate is, according to head coach Bill Coen, “perfect practice” for the CAA Tournament in March.

The Huskies — fresh off the most dominant win in program history — returned to earth, losing 74–62 to the South Alabama Jaguars Monday afternoon. The Huskies’ 62 points are a season low, and a stark departure for a team that averaged 79 points through their first five games.

Four double-digit scorers — Chad Lott, Josh Ajayi, Trhae Mitchell, and Andre Fox — powered a balanced Jaguar scoring effort. Lott shone among the four, netting 19 points on nine shots and pulling down seven rebounds. Ajayi logged a 14-point, 10-rebound double-double.

Though Mitchell scored his 14 points on an efficient nine shots, his biggest contribution was defending Northeastern’s Jordan Roland, who entered the game averaging an NCAA-leading 30 points per game. Mitchell hounded Roland, denying him the ball and preventing him from developing a rhythm. When Roland did catch the ball, he often saw two defenders jumping out at him, eating up any space a ball screen might have bought him. Even when he looked to draw the defenders and dish to open teammates, South Alabama’s constant pressure allowed them to enlist an ever-ticking shot clock as a sixth defender.

Roland hit a number of difficult shots through the team’s first five games, but today’s shots were next to impossible — flailing floaters, twisting layups, long threes, almost always tightly contested by one or two Jaguars. Many of them missed the rim entirely. A frustrated Roland finished with nine points on 3-for-13 shooting. He still leads college basketball in scoring, beating out fellow CAA guard Nate Darling (Delaware) by four tenths of a point.

Despite his struggles, Roland still notched the game’s two biggest highlights. The first came with five minutes remaining in the first half, when he stole the ball, drove downcourt, and hacked it through over Lott.

The next came about halfway through the second half, when he splashed a no-rhythm thirty-footer from out top.

The Huskies struggled to control the ball, yielding 23 points to the Jaguars on 16 turnovers. South Alabama’s inside dominance is slightly apparent in their six-point advantage in the paint, but becomes clearer with their 18–8 advantage in made free throws. The higher-quality shots they earned inside allowed them to outshoot the Huskies from the floor by 13 percent.

Bolden Brace, who would normally shore up these deficiencies for the Huskies, was scoreless in just 17 minutes on the floor, as early fouls sent him to bench for the second straight game. He fouled out with a minute left in the game after attempting two shots.

There were some encouraging signs for Northeastern, as the intense pressure on Roland forced younger players to step up on offense. Freshman guard Tyson Walker and sophomore big man Greg Eboigbodin had their best games of the young season. Walker — who, earlier in the day, was named CAA Rookie of the Week for the second time this season — dropped 20 points (8–13 FG, 2–3 3FG) and four assists in 29 minutes, assailing the Jaguars with jabstep jumpers and dashing drives.

Eboigbodin set season highs in points (12) and rebounds (9). His best play of the night came a minute into the second half, when he threw down a two-handed dunk. Three seconds later, the lights in the arena went out, leaving both squads to strategize and shoot around in the dark for about 15 minutes while building personnel scrambled to address the malfunction. Broadcasters cited a malfunction of the computer that controls the lights; Husky fans might jokingly argue otherwise.

Myles Franklin poured in eight quick points to key the Huskies’ first-half comeback, but went silent for the rest of the contest. Despite a second-half stretch where every bucket changed the lead, it was ultimately a game of runs. South Alabama forged a 15–2 in the first half; Northeastern answered it to take a one-point halftime lead. South Alabama made a run late in the second half; Northeastern had no answer. An eight-point lead became a 12-point lead through desperate intentional fouling down the stretch.

The Huskies (3–3) move to the left side of the bracket, the Jaguars (4–2) to the right. The Huskies face the Drake Bulldogs tomorrow at 11 AM EST.

Men’s Hockey Finishes Sweep Over Maine

By Matthew Cunha

Photo by Sarah Olender

Northeastern needed a comeback after entering the third period down 2–1, but goals from Neil Shea and Zach Solow allowed them to fend off Maine Saturday night at Matthews Arena. The 3–2 win gave the Huskies a weekend sweep over Maine; the women’s team beat Maine earlier in the day and will face them again tomorrow.

“It wasn’t our greatest game, and I didn’t think our execution was great,” said Northeastern head coach Jim Madigan. “But going into the third we knew we could play one good third period and win the game and that speaks to character.”

For a while, Northeastern seemed to be in full control. For more than half the game, Jayden Struble’s first collegiate goal kept them in front.

With 3:33 to go in the second period, that all changed. Mitch Fossier, who led Maine in scoring last year and captains this year’s squad, wheeled around the offensive zone and fired a last-ditch shot at Huskies goalie Craig Pantano. With players obscuring Pantano’s view, the shot slide through to tie the game at one.

About 70 seconds later, an Aidan McDonough hooking penalty gave the Black Bears a power play. Just 14 seconds after that, Pantano couldn’t corral the rebound off a Fossier shot, and Maine’s Adam Dawe capitalized to give the Black Bears a 2–1 lead. What had seemed like a sure Northeastern victory was slipping away.

But Northeastern responded. Four minutes into the third period, Neil Shea controlled the puck behind the Maine net and, despite the horrendous angle, threw the puck off the back of Maine goalie Jeremy Swayman and into the net, becoming the second Husky to score his first career goal.

“Freshman are finding their way through the season,” said Madigan. “All our freshmen are getting better. It’s nice for all our freshman just to get that first one. You remember that first goal; it’s part of your memory bank for the rest of your life.”

Northeastern got some chances on a Dawe penalty seven minutes into the period, but didn’t convert its doorstep chances.

With around six minutes remaining, Maine’s potent offensive duo of Fossier and Eduards Tralmaks had a chance to steal the game for Maine. Tralmaks led Fosser for a give and go; Fosser gave it back to Tralmaks who broke in alone as Struble was down on the ice. Tralmaks tried to deke it over to his backhand, but Pantano robbed Maine’s leading scorer.

“He’s been great all year,” said Madigan of Pantano. “He gives us a chance to win every single night. We expect it out of him. Craig bailed us out when we needed it and played really well.


With 4:13 remaining, a strong Northeastern attack bore fruit when senior defender Ryan Shea deked his way around several Maine players. Shea found fellow senior Zach Solow in front of the net, and Solow one-timed the shot past Swayman for his fourth goal of the season.

“We had a good offensive zone shift there,” said Solow. “It was a great individual effort by Shea. He beat his guy, I got lost and he put it right on my tape.”

Despite a Northeastern penalty for too many men on the ice, the Black Bears couldn’t answer. The game ended 3–2.

Northeastern outshot Maine 41–28, including 14–8 advantages in both the first and third periods. Pantano had 26 saves for Northeastern and Swayman had 38 for Maine.

Northeastern (8–4–2, 5–3–1 HEA)  has won their last three contests; Maine (7–5–2, 4–4–2 HEA) has lost their last two. The Huskies will head to Belfast, Northern Ireland for the Friendship Four. They’ll face New Hampshire on Friday and either Colgate or Princeton on Saturday.

Women’s Hockey Wins Seventh in a Row

Photo by Sarah Olender

By Catherine Morrison

Before puck drop Saturday afternoon against Maine, the women’s hockey team celebrated head coach Dave Flint, who recently passed Don MacLeod to become the winningest coach in program history. The team’s stellar play this season has put Flint’s win total up to 213.

“I’m really grateful for all the great kids I’ve worked with,” Flint said. “And all the athletes I’ve coached.

About two hours after the pregame ceremony, Flint had his 214th.

Northeastern stayed in controlled the first period, tripling Maine’s shot total. But things looked dicey 11 minutes in when Maine crowded the goal and fired three back-to-back shots, but they couldn’t get past the incredible Aerin Frankel.

Maine’s goaltender, Carly Jackson, also held down the fort for the Black Bears with some incredible saves. However, eventually one shot had to get through, and that chance came when Northeastern’s Alina Mueller came around from the back of the goal and passed to Skylar Fontaine, who bounced the puck over the goalie to get one on the board.

Chloe Aurard also received an assist. Both Mueller and Aurard tried to add goals of their own, and came close, but Mueller’s shot hit the pipe and Aurard’s was blocked by Jackson.

The second period started with a great glove save by Frankel when Tereza Vanisova tried to shoot it in. Northeastern struggled to keep control of the puck, shooting nine fewer shots on goal than they had in the first. With just under ten minutes left, Maine’s Ali Beltz broke away after Ida Kuoppala passed the puck to her and streaked down the rink. Beltz dished to Celine Tedenby who was standing next to the goalpost, and Tedenby knocked it in.

Frankel looked visibly disappointed after the goal, shaking her head. Five minutes left, Northeastern had a chance to break the tie when Vanisova was called for roughing, but the Huskies couldn’t convert on the power play.

Four minutes into the third period, Northeastern’s Brooke Hobson was called for holding, starting a power play for Maine. The five-on-three didn’t last long, as thirty seconds later Maine’s Amalie Anderson was penalized for roughing. Northeastern couldn’t capitalize on their incoming power play either after Mueller was sent to the penalty box for interference. Maine’s Ebba Strandberg tried for a penalty goal, but Frankel caught it with her glove.

With nine minutes left in the game, Hobson broke away and shot from the blue line. Jackson had blocked the shot, but Knoll was there to hit the puck in, giving Northeastern a one-goal lead.

When asked about the goal after the game, Knoll replied “I was able to jam in a loose puck in front of the net . . . thankfully it was still loose in front of the crease and I was able to jam it in.”

Maine almost took it back when Maine’s Ally Johnson slid into Frankel, pushing the entire goal back, but Frankel batted the puck away. Johnson received a penalty for goaltender interference, Maine couldn’t tie the game on the penalty kill, and the game ended with a 2–1 Huskies’ win.

Northeastern sits in second place in the Hockey East standings; the only team ahead of them is Boston College, which has played three more conference games than the Huskies have. It was the second time this season that Northeastern (12–1, 9–1 HEAW) has beat Maine (5–6–2, 3–5–1 HEAW). The Huskies will look to extend their winning streak to eight games tomorrow afternoon when the two teams square off for the third and final time this season.

Men’s Hockey Bests Maine, 5–2

Photo by Sarah Olender

By Jonathan Golbert

The Northeastern Huskies got off to a blistering start Friday night, jumping to a two–zip lead less than six minutes into their tilt with the Maine Black Bears. 

Coach Jim Madigan’s forwards led the way for the Huskies (7–4–2, 4–3–1 HEA), who now sit in fifth place in the Hockey East standings, one point behind the Black Bears (7–4–3, 4–3–2) who are in a three-way tie for second.

The first two goals of the night, courtesy of sophomore sensation Tyler Madden, were followed up by a rebound strike from Maine forward Eduards Tralmaks 11 minutes in, leaving the Huskies with a one-goal lead heading into the first intermission.

In the second, the Huskies extended their advantage when forward Zach Solow rang a tipped shot off the crossbar before batting it out of the air past Black Bear netminder Jeremy Swayman.

Solow’s power play tally was followed by Madden’s third goal of the game. The Deerfield Beach, Fla. native took a feed from junior forward Grant Jozefek and used his quick hands to blast it past a shell-shocked Swayman.

“Obviously it’s awesome,” said Madden on scoring his first-ever Husky hat trick. “What’s important is that we came out of the game with two points and we’re going to try to get two more tomorrow.”

Ben Poisson got one back for the Black Bears on an odd-man rush, sniping one above the shoulder of a helpless Craig Pantano.

But when freshman Aidan McDonough capitalized on the man-advantage a minute into the third period, the game felt out of reach for Maine coach Red Gendron’s squad. Two costly penalties in the last 10 minutes of the game scuttled any chance of a dramatic Maine comeback. 

“We were not the best version of ourselves tonight,” said a frustrated Gendron after the game. “They played the type of game they succeed with, but that wasn’t the best we can do.” 

The Huskies netted a comfortable 5–2 win in front of an enthusiastic crowd, but won’t have much time to rest on their laurels. The two teams will battle again Saturday night. Matt Cunha and Adam Doucette will call the game from Matthews Arena, with coverage beginning at 6:45 EST.

Men’s Basketball Claims Largest Win in Program History

By Milton Posner

WORCESTER, MA — From 1096 to 1271, the Roman Catholic Church waged a series of wars against Muslim powers in the eastern Mediterranean. Though the Crusades arguably increased Christianity’s reach, the Church’s wealth, and the Pope’s power, the Crusaders repeatedly failed in their main goal of retaking the Holy Land.

On Tuesday night, in a conflict with far lesser stakes, the Northeastern Huskies rode into Worcester to battle the Holy Cross Crusaders on the basketball court. The modern Crusaders fared even worse than their namesake.

In 100 years of men’s basketball, Northeastern has never dominated like they did Tuesday night. It was overwhelming. It was absurd. It was borderline unfair. They eviscerated Holy Cross 101–44.

The 57-point margin of victory eclipsed the previous record of 56 set against Connecticut in 1946 and equaled against Suffolk in 1984. It is the second school scoring record the Huskies have broken in their last four games, with Jordan Roland’s 42-point masterpiece against Harvard on November 8 setting a new individual record.

Holy Cross got the scoring going with a free throw two minutes in. It was their only lead of the night, and it lasted for 15 seconds.

Their first field goal was a three-pointer five minutes in. It would be their last bucket from downtown for 35 minutes.

Northeastern turned the first half into an unmitigated farce. They clogged the passing lanes, poked the ball away from incautious ballhandlers, and reaped the benefits with easy transition buckets down the other end. They pushed the pace on almost every possession whether they had stolen the ball or not, as they recognized early that the Crusaders couldn’t keep pace.

Jordan Roland, the nation’s leading scorer entering the game, played perhaps his best basketball of the season in the first half. He dropped 21 points on 8-for-9 shooting and made all five of his threes. Almost every perimeter shot he took was tightly contested, fading away, or both. He was in such a rhythm that he almost shot from 30 feet while bringing the ball up. When a hard close forced him to shovel the ball to a teammate, his wide grin matched the feeling he and every fan in the arena had: it probably would have gone in.

Though Roland didn’t have as dominant a second half — he played just 27 minutes all game in light of the Huskies’ enormous lead — he did hit the most unbelievable shot in a game full of them. After a hesitation move forced his defender to run into him near the foul line, Roland chucked the ball up. He was nearly parallel to the floor, shooting with an awkward flailing motion, only because he thought a foul would be called.

It wasn’t, but Roland made it anyway. He finished with 28 points on 11-for-13 shooting, including 6-of-7 from downtown. When he left the game for good with 12 minutes remaining in the second half, he was one point shy of outscoring the Crusaders by himself.

“Jordan is the centerpiece,” Northeastern head coach Bill Coen remarked. “I’m actually shocked when he misses.”

When Roland wasn’t dominating, Jason Strong was. The seldom-used forward contributed 17 minutes on a night when regular starting big man Tomas Murphy sat with an ankle injury (Coen doesn’t expect the injury will sideline Murphy for long). Strong nailed seven of his eight shots — including all four threes — and finished with a career-high 18 points and six rebounds. His textbook, upright shooting form was on full display.

“I think he’s been a little bit frustrated at times early on,” Coen said of Strong. “But he attacked practice this week. That’s the type of player he can be. He might be our second-best shooter [after Roland].”

By halftime, Northeastern had opened up a 63–23 lead. Coen typically waits to empty his bench until the closing minutes of a blowout, when his lead is secure beyond any reasonable doubt. By the end of the first half, all 11 Huskies that dressed to play had seen the court. Strong, Quirin Emanga, Vito Cubrilo, and Guilien Smith — who entered tonight’s contest with a combined 13 minutes of playing time this season — played 53 combined minutes tonight.

“It was an opportunity for us to go deeper in the bench,” Coen observed. “We’re going to need that later on in the season, certainly in the tournament down in Florida.”

Northeastern shot a ludicrous 71 percent from the floor — and 75 percent from three — in the first half. Some of the threes were difficult, contested shots that went in anyway, but many of them were open shots earned through crisp passing, strong ball screens, movement off the ball, and a nearly constant transition pace.

“When you’re catching the ball in rhythm, [you get] much better shots,” Coen said. “We shared the ball at a high level tonight, and I think that set the tone. That type of passing got contagious, and then the basket got real big for us.”

Northeastern’s 42–24 rebounding edge makes sense in light of Holy Cross’s abysmal shooting (17–57 FG, 2–27 3FG). It’s easier to get rebounds when the other team is bricking most of their shots. But Northeastern’s 11–9 offensive rebounding edge is nothing short of remarkable considering they had so few opportunities to get them. Greg Eboigbodin led the rebounding with eight, followed by Strong’s six. Emanga and Shaq Walters both registered five-point, five-rebound games.

Eboigbodin scored six efficient points, but his biggest contribution was his defense. He played a season-high 25 minutes and committed one foul, a season low. His coverage on Holy Cross’s ball screens — stepping up on good shooters, dropping back to contain drivers, and hedging when appropriate — defended Northeastern’s interior territory against the Crusaders and helped the Huskies build and sustain momentum.

Tyson Walker, Myles Franklin, and Max Boursiqout all finished in double figures. Walker stood out, earning 15 points with a series of drives.

Besides shooting and rebounding, Northeastern won the battle of assists (23–7), steals (13–7), fastbreak points (21–6), points in the paint (38–22), and points off turnovers (24–6), among others. There were no individual bright spots for the Crusaders; their four leading scorers combined for just 32 points and all of them missed more shots than they made. Leading scorer Drew Lowder missed all six of his three-point attempts in Holy Cross’s biggest home loss since they started playing at the Hart Center in 1975.

The win bumped Northeastern to 3–2 on the year; the Crusaders are winless in four games. Northeastern will fly to Fort Myers, Florida for the Gulf Coast Showcase, where they begin play against South Alabama Monday at 11 AM ET.

Even though Northeastern entered the game on a two-game skid, and even without the hot-handed Tomas Murphy, the Huskies were expected to handle Holy Cross. They were not expected to bludgeon them to this degree, in this manner.

The first half was a wonder, when any Northeastern player could cast up a contested three with everyone in the building assuming it would fall. The hot shooting, mixed with the volume of turnovers the Husky defense forced, made it seem as though Northeastern was making more shots than Holy Cross was taking. The game was a fastbreak and the Huskies were running it.

It wasn’t suspenseful. It wasn’t competitive. It bordered on being a joke. But, especially for the first 20 minutes, it was a sight to behold.

Women’s Hockey Topples No. 6 BC

Photo by Sarah Olender

By Catherine Morrison

No. 4 Northeastern faced its biggest opponent yet Tuesday night when they visited No. 6 Boston College. Northeastern was coming off of a win against New Hampshire, BC off a win over Boston University. The two rivals battled, but Northeastern came on top 3-0.

The first period started slow, but with 13:12 left in the first period, NU’s Matti Hartman gained control of the puck and dished to Chloe Aurard, who sent it to Alina Mueller. Mueller raced down the ice and shot into the left side of the goal to put the Huskies on the board.

A few minutes later, another Mueller attempt missed wide. BC’s Erin Connolly charged after Mueller, lost her balance, and slid ribs-first into the goalpost; she was fine after a few moments on the ice.

Northeastern goalie Aerin Frankel held strong the whole game, saving 31 shots. With 4:30 remaining in the first, the lost her glove and stick and still held the Eagles at bay. Shortly after, she stretched out onto the ice to deflect a shot from BC’s Kelly Browne.

The second period was a puck-control battle devoid of power plays. BC edged Northeastern with a 14–10 shots-on-goal margin, but they couldn’t beat Frankel. When Lindsay Agnew sent an airborne shot toward the goal, Frankel caught it. Hadley Hartmetz and Savannah Norcross tried to fire one by her; Frankel stopped them both with glove saves. The only time BC came close to scoring was a Hannah Bilka shot off the pipe.

After ten minutes of back and forth in the third, Northeastern regained their momentum. Aurard slid the puck across the goal to Skylar Fontaine, who cleaned it up.

After Fontaine just missed a second goal a minute later, BC’s Cayla Barnes and NU’s Jess Schryver collided near the wall. Barnes remained on the ice and ended up exiting the game.

With five minutes left, Aurard joined the scoring when Mueller passed to her on the power play.

After the game, Northeastern coach Dave Flint remarked that BC was Northeastern’s biggest test so far this season. Chloe Aurard agreed, saying it felt good to beat one of their biggest rivals.

The win moved the Huskies to 11–1 (8–1 HEAW) and dropped the Eagles to 10–2–1 (9–2–1 HEAW). Northeastern looks to keep their six-game winning streak going on Saturday against the Maine Black Bears.